Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Whole School Network

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Business Development

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Building

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

To download a copy of the report, Click Here. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, across three major groupings:

1. Community Safety: violent crime, property crime
2. Housing Market Activity: home sales, home purchase loan amounts, completed foreclosures
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Business Development

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Building

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

To download a copy of the report, Click Here. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, across three major groupings:

1. Community Safety: violent crime, property crime
2. Housing Market Activity: home sales, home purchase loan amounts, completed foreclosures
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Building

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

To download a copy of the report, Click Here. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, across three major groupings:

1. Community Safety: violent crime, property crime
2. Housing Market Activity: home sales, home purchase loan amounts, completed foreclosures
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Building

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

To download a copy of the report, Click Here. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, across three major groupings:

1. Community Safety: violent crime, property crime
2. Housing Market Activity: home sales, home purchase loan amounts, completed foreclosures
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

To download a copy of the report, Click Here. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, across three major groupings:

1. Community Safety: violent crime, property crime
2. Housing Market Activity: home sales, home purchase loan amounts, completed foreclosures
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here
3. Commercial Vitality: small business loan amounts, business growth revenues and jobs

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. From the metrics in each of the three domains, we create a quality of life score for the West Side. The variability of this score from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Quality of Life Score = Safety + Housing + Commercial Vitality

Finally, we utilized the work done at Opportunity Nation to create an Opportunity Index score for Chicago’s West Side communities.

Opportunity Index = Economy + Education + Community

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Average wage implications for lifetime earnings
Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall % of job growth to West Side
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments (Factor = TBD)
Overall capital absorption capacity score
Overall quality of life score for West Side (TBD)

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Change in classroom discipline rate in grades K-3

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Average length of stay
Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Quality of Life indicator (TBD)

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Utilizing the Quality of Life and Opportunity Index scores, we can gain a better understanding of the changing communities in which we invest.

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

STEM Training

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Data & Outcomes

Bethel New Life assesses our programs by measuring performance and outcomes. We apply this research in many ways—creating practical applications, identifying best practices, developing innovative pilot programs, and making recommendations for public policy change.

Bethel’s Research and Evaluation Team continually evaluates our work. By closely monitoring our programs and incorporating client feedback, we endeavor to develop replicable models, establish best practices, and share lessons learned in order to broaden the impact of our success.

These are the key metrics we regularly track to determine the return on our investments.

Education Key Metrics

Birth to Three

• # of hours of reading each day
• % of families with at least one parent employed
• % of families with stable housing
• % of families that have not moved in past year
• Age when family began reading to child
• % of families reading to child prior to age 1
• % of families reading to child > 1 hr/day
• Vocabulary at age level
• Average academic attainment
• % of parents with high school education or above
• % families under 18 at time of pregnancy
• % families with 6 or more children

Whole School Network

• Attendance rates
• ROI – Cost per 1% change in attendance rate
• Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

STEM Training

• # of students completing STEM Science Club
• % of students considering STEM career
• % of students enrolling in elective STEM courses

K-3 Public School Outcomes

• Average academic gains of students in the Brain Train
• Total cumulative academic gains by students
• Rate of learning (academic gains/time enrolled)
• Cost/student
• Gains made/dollar spent

Community Economic Development Key Metrics

Business Development

• # of businesses supported
• Annual revenues of supported businesses
• Annual revenue growth of supported businesses
• # of employees of supported businesses
• # of jobs added in past year
• # of new entrepreneurial businesses launched
• # of employees of new entrepreneurial businesses
• # of business loans made
• Amount of money lent

Workforce Development

• # of graduates of AMCP/Trades program
• % of participants graduating
• % of participants employed
• % of participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of participants employed
• Average training cost/participant
• % of participants making academic gains
• Average academic gains made across participants
• # of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed
• % of workforce development participants employed at 3 months
• Average wage of workforce development participants

Asset Buildingt

• % of participants improving credit scores
• Average gain in credit score
• % of participants purchasing new home
• % of participants with banking account

Senior Housing

Supportive Living

• # of falls
• % of residents receiving flu vaccine
• Hospitalization rate
• E/R utilization rate
• 30-day inpatient hospital readmission rate
• Occupancy rate
• Average length of stay (years)
• Length of vacancies

Independent Housing

• Occupancy rate
• Average length of vacancy (days)

External Assessments

In addition to our own assessments, Bethel New Life has been the focus of considerable research and writing over the years. Below, please find a summary of Dr. Daniel Cooper’s 2012 dissertation from Vanderbilt University that studied the non-financial impacts and implications of the foreclosure crisis for low-income minority communities. Among other questions, he sought to determine if the efforts of community-based organizations produced more stable low-income homeowners.

Dr. Cooper examined Bethel’s efforts to build affordable homes and stable homeowners on Chicago’s West Side. The study began with a database of 99 clients who purchased Bethel-built homes between 1996 and 2008. These clients also received some form of pre-purchase homeownership counseling. The history of each property was tracked to determine whether subprime loans were used, whether a leveraged refinance or subprime refinance occurred, whether a foreclosure filing occurred, and whether the homeowner was still in the home through 2011. Next, a random, matched sample of similar properties was created, and the history of each of these properties was tracked along the same variables. When comparing the two samples, it was found that:

• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.7 times) less likely to use a subprime purchase loan
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (1.4 times) less likely to use a leveraged refinance
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2.6 times) less likely to have a foreclosure filing
• Bethel purchasers were significantly (2 times) more likely to still be in their home through 2011

For a powerpoint summarizing his research, see this link. To contact Dr. Dan Cooper, email dan.g.cooper@gmail.com.

Evaluation of Community Impact

Evaluating community impact is challenging. For every measure of potential impact, there are a number of factors that could contribute — including the investments of Bethel New Life. We have determined to measure community impact by evaluating the quality of life of the community, as reflected in two standardized ratings:

1. Hardship Index: : click here
2. Opportunity Index Activity: Created by Opportunity Nation + Applied to Chicago’s West Side communities – click here

To the extent that we are able, we include direct contributions from Bethel’s investment efforts in our evaluation. The variability of these scores from quarter to quarter and year to year can provide some information as to the improving health of the West Side communities.

Community Economic Development

Total $ contributed to West Side economy
Total new $ contributed to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative wage contribution of all participants to West Side economy
Economic impact of these investments
Cumulative asset building of participants
Economic impact of these investments

Education

Change in target school standardized test scores
Change in target school attendance
% of target school performing at or above grade level in K-3
Potential improvement in HS graduation rate

Senior Housing

Annual cumulative cost to Medicaid (tax payers)
Annual average HS$ saved by LOS at SLF (yrs) – $9,908,334
Cumulative annual savings to tax payer from SLF – $8,437,034

Board of Directors

Officers

Chair: Geoffrey Koss, The Private Bank
Vice Chair: Dr. Cynthia Barnes-Boyd, UIC Neighborhoods Initiative
Treasurer: Bruce Martin, JP Morgan Chase
Secretary: Jill Schumann, LeadingAge Maryland

Directors

Deborah Bennett, Polk Bros. Foundation
Dale & Jackie Bruckner, Peregrine, Stime, Newman, Ritzman & Bruckner, Ltd.
Stephen Cole, Retired
Andrew Curtis, General RE-New England Asset Management, Inc.
Juan Jose Gonzales, Stand for Children
Rev. Sherman Hicks, ELCA
Annie Mae Liddell, Community Member
Jewel Mandeville, Retired
Rev. Larry Martin, Hope Church Chicago
Nat Piggee, HP3 Law
Paul Rimington, Diemasters
Blake Sercye, Jenner & Block LLP
Valora Starr, ELCA
Jay Weaver, Walton Street Capital
Laurie Wilkinson, Thrivent Financial for Luterans
John “Jay” Young, Children’s Home + Aid

 

 

OUR DONORS

None of the work that Bethel does in West Side communities would be possible without the generous support of our donors. We would like to thank all of these individuals and organizations for making contributions in 2013 as we recognize them here on our web site. We greatly appreciate your support.

$50, 000 in Matching Funds for ETP Donations

Interested in Donating to the Entrepreneurship Training Program? Bethel New Life has a tremendous opportunity to receive up to $50,000 in donations to the ETP matched by one of our generous donors. Help us reach this number and raise $100,000 to support emerging entrepreneurs on Chicago’s west side. If you are a new donor, a returning donor who gave to the ETP last year, or a donor making a larger investment, your gift will be matched.

January 1 – December 31, 2013
Thanks to all our donors

INDIVIDUALS $5,000 AND ABOVE

  • John Galik and Lori Vallelunga
  • Gerald & Karen Kolschowsky
  • Michael & Lindy Keiser
  • Jay and Carrie Weaver

INDIVIDUALS $1,000 – $4,999

  • James Carstensen
  • Jack & Lana Grodoski
  • Bruce Martin
  • Sara Spoonheim
  • Scott & Nancy Christopher
  • Sherman Hicks
  • Philip & Jeannine May
  • Barney & Nancy Straus
  • Stephen & Christine Cole
  • Carole & Philip Hildebrant
  • Sheila Meyer
  • Marilyn & Ed Thompson
  • Tim Earle & Eliza Earle
  • Robert & Susan Harvey Houston
  • Richard & Beverly Moody
  • Mike & Claire Van Konynenburg
  • Bruce & Diane Erickson
  • David & Kathleen Johnson
  • Wes & Janis Nebel
  • Steven VanBever
  • Reuben Erickson
  • Lester & Becky Knight
  • Nat & Summer Piggee
  • Amy & Jason VandenBrook
  • Donald Gancer
  • Ronald Kok-Alblas & Kim Morton
  • Paul & Barbara Rimington
  • Bill & Tricia Williams
  • Dorothy Greiner
  • Jeffrey & Kristine Koth
  • Gerald & Barbara Schultz

INDIVIDUALS $250 – $999

  • Lorraine & Randy Barba
  • Bruce Hamming & Mary Hamming
  • Elizabeth McKay
  • Paul & Cynthia Stark
  • Verna Baughman
  • Kimberly Hendee
  • Mary Nelson
  • John & Sandra Stumme
  • Owen Beacom
  • Peter Holsten
  • Leo & Linda Patterson
  • Pat Tauchert
  • Marilyn Breiding
  • Dave & Louise Loder
  • Arnold Pritsker
  • John Timmer
  • Theodore & Ann Doege
  • Bill & Kathy Kastilahn
  • McLouis & Harriette Robinet
  • Will & Mrs. Wagner
  • Eric & Jodie Draut
  • William & Charlotte Kennedy
  • Graham & Ruth Rogeness
  • D. Joseph & Susan Walton
  • Michael & Lauri Etter
  • Ruth Kingsley
  • Michael Rohrbeck
  • Brian & Suzanne Warner
  • Janet Fisher
  • Michael & Marian Kneafsey
  • David & Gael Romoser
  • Ann Westby
  • David Fox
  • Dirk & Mary Landis
  • Gerald & Barbara Schultz
  • Walter & Jeanette Whisler
  • Jill Graham
  • Sandy & Bill Leitsch
  • Jill Schumann
  • Laurie Wilkinson
  • Lawrence & Frances Grisham
  • Patrick & Patricia Madison
  • Jim & Diana Skogsbergh
  • John Wischnewsky & Ann McKenzie
  • Leigh & Rob Gunther
  • Jewel & Pat Mandeville
  • Gordon & Karen Souden
  • Rozella Youngquist

INDIVIDUALS UNDER $250

  • Scott Aaseng& Gale Holmlund
  • Terry & Mary Denley
  • Pamela Marino
  • Paul &SharleneRoge
  • Carol Albright
  • Bill &Tesse Donnelly
  • Larry Martin
  • John & Gwendolyn Rogers
  • Marge Andersen
  • Clifford Dotseth
  • Dorothy Martinson
  • Janice Ruch
  • Bob & Mary Anderson
  • Thomas & Janice Dusek
  • Mary Beth Mary
  • JuergenRusnak
  • Bruce & Sara Anderson
  • Diane Dyer-Neely
  • Theodore & Jacqueline Maxeiner
  • Jenna Russell
  • Delbert & Mrs. Anderson
  • Jeffrey & Kimberly Eggert
  • Robert & Mary McCann
  • Priscilla Rutter
  • Ann & Tim Anderson
  • Ted Elbert
  • John McKnight
  • Miriam & David Sanders
  • Carl & Mary Ann Anderson
  • Louise Esh Heidorn
  • David & Ruth McLaren
  • James & Margaret Schlegel
  • Joanna Anderson
  • Donald & Mrs. Fagerberg
  • Phyllis Meyer & Paula Besler
  • Al & Nancy Schmelter
  • John & Laura Anderson
  • Faytonia Fair
  • Barry & Karen Miller
  • Ralph & Donna Schuler
  • Vincent Anderson
  • Kathy Figler
  • Alton Mitchell
  • Dieter & Diane Schulte
  • Garold&Petrine Ashley
  • Mark & Janet Fisher
  • C.J. & Lily Mogen
  • Rhoda Sharpee
  • George & Ruth Ashman
  • Bill & Judy Fletcher
  • Mary Jo Mulcohy
  • Lynn Sivertsen
  • Caron Atlas
  • Diane Froelich
  • Ernie & Janette Muller
  • Bruce Smith
  • Shirley Balocca
  • Barbara Gartner
  • Edward Muller & Karen Vanlandeghem
  • Mary Ann Smith
  • Cynthia Barnes-Boyd
  • Rhonda Gaw
  • Ken Muse
  • Newl& Martha Smith
  • Rick & Marilyn Beato
  • Robert & Sue Gehm
  • Dominic Nakis
  • Ricardo Smith
  • Kurt & Sarah Belinski
  • Susan& Randy Neufeld
  • Alison Nelson
  • Paul & Cynthia Stark
  • Ronald & Carol Bentsen
  • Sandra Jean & Sonia Anderson
  • Karen & Bruce Nelson
  • Valora Starr
  • James & Margaret Blair
  • Gladys Johnson
  • Gary & Karen Nelson
  • Marian & Cliff Stettler
  • Susan & Klaus Dieter Bloecks
  • Davey Johnson
  • Rev. Norman Nelson
  • Joanna Stutzman
  • Doris Boan-Brucker
  • Herman & Dorothy Kathan
  • Diane Nieman
  • Robert Sutherland
  • Donald & Irma Bravin
  • Lee Keenan
  • Karen & David Norquist
  • Lara Suvada
  • Patricia Broughton
  • Mark & Catherine Rude
  • Polly Novak
  • Wesley & Sonja Swanson
  • Dale & Jacquelyn Bruckner
  • Bonnie Kohl
  • Veronica Novy& Mary Gudium
  • Donald & Mrs. Swanson
  • Elizabeth & Jason Bulthuis
  • Sharon Kollmer
  • Matt O?Brien & Kat Howard
  • Margaret Van Vleet
  • Daniel Burke
  • Carl & Virginia Landahl
  • Verna & Don Offermann
  • Wayne & Harriet VerGowe
  • Boyd Steven & Carolyn Westerberg Callahan
  • Mark Larson
  • Ken & Barb Olson
  • Daniel & Marianne Wachholz
  • Manny & Nancy Carrasquillo
  • Byron Lee & Audrey Williams-Lee
  • Stephen Olson
  • Sheryl & Chris Wade
  • James & Mrs. Case
  • Mary Lee & James Larsen
  • David & Meredith Onion
  • Bob & Marietta Walsh
  • Marc & Christine Chason
  • Victor & Anne Lee
  • Jean Ordonez
  • Dorothy Watson
  • Douglas & Mrs. Chester
  • Dee LeFevour
  • Janet Pate
  • Morton & Lorraine Wax
  • Edward Coleman
  • Martin & Barbara Letscher
  • Alvin &ArdeniaPeart
  • Leslie & Jeannie Weber
  • Carolyn & Patrick Collins
  • Annie Mae Liddell
  • Thomas & Jean Pfaff
  • Ken Westlake
  • Kelly Collins
  • Patricia & Lindner
  • Joe Pixler
  • Curtis & Michele Whisler
  • Sharon Collins
  • Alan Lindquist
  • Joan & Robert Pope
  • Randy White
  • Susan Cone
  • Sharon Lindstron
  • Ralph Quere
  • Marian Wolf
  • Donna Cooper
  • Recbecca Little
  • Edward & Kathleen Quinn
  • Adriane & David Wong
  • Andrew Curtis
  • Bob & Gail Loveman
  • Andrea & Mark Decker Redfearn
  • Jessye Rachel Wright
  • Saul &Daina Cyvas
  • Joe Madden
  • McLouis&HarrietteRobinet
  • Clark &MimZeddies
  • Rebecca Dahlstrom
  • Joyce Maddock
  • Nancy & David Rocks

CONGREGATIONS

  • Christ Lutheran Church of Vernon Hills
  • Christian Fellowship for all Nations
  • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
  • First Congregational Church of Western Springs
  • Grace Lutheran Church and School of River Forest
  • Grace Lutheran Church, La Grange
  • Kenilworth Union Church
  • Lutheran Church of the Ascension of Northfield
  • Metropolitan Chicago Synod
  • Our Savior’s Lutheran Church of Rockford
  • Our Savior’s Evangelical Lutheran Church of Arlington Hts
  • Peace Lutheran Church of New Lenox
  • Redeemer Lutheran Church
  • St. James Lutheran Church of Lake Forest
  • St. Mark’s Lutheran Church of Waukegan
  • Women of The E.L.C.A. – St. Luke’s Lutheran
  • Zion Lutheran Church (Rev. Dr. Michael Thomas)

FOUNDATIONS & CORPORATIONS

  • Abbott Laboratories Employee Giving Campaign
  • ABC Bank
  • Advocate Health Care
  • Applegate & Thorne-Thomsen, P.C.
  • AT&T United Way Employee Giving Campaign
  • Bank of America Merrill Lynch
  • Beverly Bank
  • Cole Taylor Bank
  • Community Bank of Oak Park River Forest
  • Computershare
  • Draper & Kramer
  • Evergreen Real Estate Services LLC
  • Farr Associates Architecture
  • Gerald A. & Karen A. Kolschowsky Foundation, Inc.
  • Greenplan Management, Inc.
  • Guaranty Bank
  • Haywood and Fleming Associates
  • Hirsch-Schwartz Foundation
  • Holsten Management Corp.
  • Illinois Housing Development Authority
  • Johnson & Bell Ltd.
  • JP Morgan Chase Foundation
  • Kittleman& Associates
  • LanerMuchin Ltd.
  • LISC National Headquarters
  • MacArthur’s Restaurant
  • May’s Honey Farm
  • Mesa West Capital
  • Northern Trust Matching Gift Volunteer Grant
  • Plante& Moran
  • Pluymert, MacDonald & Hargrove Ltd.
  • PNC Real Estate
  • Polk Bros. Foundation
  • Rev. Dr. Granger Westberg Trust
  • Roeschley Hybrids, LLC
  • Rosens-Morseview Pharmacy
  • State Bank Of India
  • Stutz Company
  • T. A. Cummings Jr. Co.
  • The Chicago Community Trust
  • The Christopher Family Foundation
  • The Field Foundation of Illinois
  • The Hunter-Miller Group, Inc.
  • The Owens Foundation
  • The Private Bank
  • Therapy Providers of Tinley Park, LTD
  • Thrivent Financial for Lutherans
  • United Insurance
  • United Way
  • Urban Partnership Bank
  • US Bank
  • Vedder Price P.C.
  • Walter S. Mander Foundation
  • Walton St. Capital
  • Yoga Chicago Ltd. – (Steffensen, Sharon)
  • Zenith Fabricating Company

IN-KIND

  • Austin Weekly News
  • Better World Books
  • Rick and Marilyn Beato